[cloudera] #datascientist BigDataFr recommends: Apache Kafka for Beginners

<div id="wp-socials-general-btn"></div><div style="clear:both">BigDataFr recommends: Apache Kafka for Beginners

‘When used in the right way and for the right use case, Kafka has unique attributes that make it a highly attractive option for data integration.

Apache Kafka  is creating a lot of buzz these days. While LinkedIn, where Kafka was founded, is the most well known user, there are many companies successfully using this technology.

So now that the word is out, it seems the world wants to know: What does it do? Why does everyone want to use it? How is it better than existing solutions? Do the benefits justify replacing existing systems and infrastructure?

In this post, we’ll try to answers those questions. We’ll begin by briefly introducing Kafka, and then demonstrate some of Kafka’s unique features by walking through an example scenario. We’ll also cover some additional use cases and also compare Kafka to existing solutions.

What is Kafka?

Kafka is one of those systems that is very simple to describe at a high level, but has an incredible depth of technical detail when you dig deeper. The Kafka documentation does an excellent job of explaining the many design and implementation subtleties in the system, so we will not attempt to explain them all here. In summary, Kafka is a distributed publish-subscribe messaging system that is designed to be fast, scalable, and durable.

Like many publish-subscribe messaging systems, Kafka maintains feeds of messages in topics. Producers write data to topics and consumers read from topics. Since Kafka is a distributed system, topics are partitioned and replicated across multiple nodes.

Messages are simply byte arrays and the developers can use them to store any object in any format – with String, JSON, and Avro the most common. It is possible to attach a key to each message, in which case the producer guarantees that all messages with the same key will arrive to the same partition. When consuming from a topic, it is possible to configure a consumer group with multiple consumers. Each consumer in a consumer group will read messages from a unique subset of partitions in each topic they subscribe to, so each message is delivered to one consumer in the group, and all messages with the same key arrive at the same consumer.

What makes Kafka unique is that Kafka treats each topic partition as a log (an ordered set of messages). Each message in a partition is assigned a unique offset. Kafka does not attempt to track which messages were read by each consumer and only retain unread messages; rather, Kafka retains all messages for a set amount of time, and consumers are responsible to track their location in each log. Consequently, Kafka can support a large number of consumers and retain large amounts of data with very little overhead.

Next, let’s look at how Kafka’s unique properties are applied in a specific use case.

Kafka at Work

Suppose we are developing a massive multiplayer online game. In these games, players cooperate and compete with each other in a virtual world. Often players trade with each other, exchanging game items and money, so as game developers it is important to make sure players don’t cheat: Trades will be flagged if the trade amount is significantly larger than normal for the player and if the IP the player is logged in with is different than the IP used for the last 20 games. In addition to flagging trades in real-time, we also want to load the data to Apache Hadoop, where our data scientists can use it to train and test new algorithms.[…]’
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By Gwen Shapira & Jeff Holoman
Source: cloudera.com

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